Clove Leaf Rectified Essential Oil

Price: $3.92
Clove Leaf Rectified Essential Oil

Eugenia caryophyllata aka syzygium aromaticum, eugenia aromatica, e. carophyllus leaves, fractional re distilled*, from Indonesia.

*This rectified oil is obtained from the re distillation of crude clove oil and crude clove essential oil. When an essential oil contains any impurities, it can be purified by re-distillation - either in steam or in a vacuum, and this purification by re-distillation is referred to as rectification.

Aroma: With the sweet top notes characteristic of the clove family, the leaf oil is more herbaceous, in contrast to the spicier aroma of the clove bud essential oil.

Therapeutic Properties :
Analgesic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, anti-neuralgic, carminative, anti-infectious, disinfectant, insecticide, stimulant, stomachic, uterine and tonic

Cognitive support and brain health. [Dorene Petersen, Presentation: Clinical Use of Aromatherapy for Brain Health: 7 Essential Oils. August 9, 2017, New Brunswick, NJ. Alliance of International Aromatherapists 2017 Conference. AIA 2017 Conference Proceedings page 221-222.]

Arthritis, asthma, bronchitis, rheumatism, sprains, strains, toothache. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 59-62.]

Main Constituents:
Eugenol: 85.95%
B-Caryophyllene
Eugenyl acetate
a-Caryophyllene
Isoeugenol
Methyleugenol

[K.H. Kubeczka, Essential Oils Analysis by Capillary Gas Chromatography and Carbon-13 NMR Spectoroscopy, Second Edition. (Chichester: Wiley, 2002). B.M. Lawrence, Essential Oils 1979-1980 (Wheaton: Allured Publishing, 1981), 33-34. B.M. Lawrence, Essential Oils 1988-1991 (Wheaton: Allured Publishing, 1993), 36. Sources cited in Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 254.]

Description / Colour / Consistency: A thin, colourless to pale yellow liquid.

Product Abstract: Clove Bud Essential Oil is derived from the slender evergreen that grows up to 12 meters in height (approximately 36 feet). At the start of the rainy season, long buds appear that change colour over time and are beaten from the trees and dried. These are the cloves sold that are sold commercially. The word 'clove' comes from the Latin word clavus, meaning 'nail' because the shaft and head of the clove bud resembled an ancient nail. Cloves were among the most precious of spices of Europe during the 16th and 17th centuries and were worth more than their weight in gold. They continue to be used in Ayurvedic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, western herbalism, and in dentistry.

Blends With: Cinnamon Bark, Nutmeg, Grapefruit, Lemon, Orange, Peppermint, Rosemary, Rose, Lavender, Clary Sage and Ylang-ylang.

Cautions: Dilute well before use; for external use only. May cause skin irritation in some individuals; a skin test is recommended prior to use. Contact with eyes should be avoided. Never apply undiluted to the skin.

Tisserand and Young indicate that when using Clove Bud Oil, there is moderate risk for mucous membrane irritation, may inhibit blood clotting and pose a drug interaction hazard. It may cause embryotoxicity. There is a moderate risk of skin sensitization, and Tisserand and Young recommend a dermal maximum of 0.5%. They advise not to use topically on children age 2 or younger. Reading Tisserand and Young's full profile is recommended. [Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 255.]

Photo By Prof. Chen Hualin (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons