Nettle, Stinging, Tea Bag Cut, Certified Organic, Sold by the Gram

Price: $0.08
Nettle, Stinging, Cut & Sifted, by the gram

Urtica dioica aka stinging nettle. Tea Bag Cut.

Sold by the gram, $0.0814/g. Please bring or order a bag.

MAIL OR PICK UP ORDER (pre-packed)
You must (please) order a minimum of 100g and buy a biodegradable bag or container.
We reserve the right to change your container to a more appropriate size as needed and to credit or invoice you for any difference in your total order cost.

OVERVIEW
Nettle has a long medicinal history. In medieval Europe, it was used as a diuretic (to rid the body of excess water) and to treat joint pain and has been used for hundreds of years to treat painful muscles and joints, eczema, arthritis, gout, and anemia. Today, many people use it to treat urinary problems during the early stages of an enlarged prostate (called benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH). It is also used for urinary tract infections, hay fever (allergic rhinitis), or in compresses or creams for treating joint pain, sprains and strains, tendonitis, and insect bites.

CONSTITUENTS
Formic acid, histamine, serotonin, choline, minerals, chlorophyll, amino acids, lecithin, carotenoids, flavonoids, sterols, tannins and vitamins. Nettle's main plant chemicals include: acetophenone, acetylcholine, agglutinins, alkaloids, astragalin, butyric acid, caffeic acids, carbonic acid, chlorogenic acid, chlorophyll, choline, coumaric acid, folacin, formic acid, friedelins, histamine, kaempherols, coproporphyrins, lectins, lecithin, lignans, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, nerolidol, palmitic acid, pantothenic acid, quercetin, quinic acid, scopoletin, secoisolariciresinol, serotonin, sitosterols, stigmasterol, succinic acid, terpenes, violaxanthin, and xanthophylls

COMMON PREPARATIONS: As a tea, extract and capsule.

CAUTIONS: No known precautions.

DISCLAIMER
The information presented on this website is for informational, reference and educational purposes only and should not be interpreted as a substitute for diagnosis and treatment by a health care practitioner.

Photo thanks to Wikimedia Commons and John Tann from Sydney, Australia [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)]